GLOSSARY OF TERMS

 

SPINNING

Batt

Fauxlag

Licker

Predrafting

Ratio

Rolag

S-twist

Semi-worsted

Short draw

Z-twist

 

WEAVING

Balanced weave

Beat

Dent

Design

Draft

Ends per inch (epi)

Fell line

Float

Floating selvage

Header

Lift Plan

Pick

Plain weave

Point twill

Selvage

Sett

Shed

Sley

Tartan

Threading

Tie-up

Treadling

Warp








 
 

A type of fiber preparation that is carded using a drum carder or a carding machine.

Similar to a rolag but made from a drumcarded batt.

Small drum that aligns and feeds fiber onto the larger drum of the carder.

Thinning the fiber to make it easier to draft (spin).

Speed the bobbin turns for every revolution of the drive wheel. It is expressed as a pair of numbers.

A type of fiber preparation that is handcarded and the fiber is rolled into little tubes.

Yarn spun with the wheel going counterclockwise.

Combination of a woolen preparation (carded) and spun with a short draw (aka worsted) drafting method

Fiber is spun, keeping the twist in front of the fiber in your hand; producing a more compressed and smoother yarn (worsted).

Yarn spun with the wheel going clockwise.


 

The same number of weft picks as warp ends per inch.

Press the weft into place.

Single slot in a reed. Example “10-dent” means 10 spaces in an inch.

A project’s weave and pattern, color arrangement, dimensions, borders if any, and complete directions.

Weaving instructions that diagram the threading plan, tie-up and treadling.

The number of warp ends per inch.

The edge of the fabric where the last weft pick was woven.

A warp or weft yarn that travels over more than one warp end or weft pick.

Selvage thread on each side of the warp is threaded directly through the reed without being threaded through a heddle.

Waste yarn woven at the start of a project to spread the warp. Also, the weaving at the beginning and end of the piece.

Used primarily on table looms; indicates the shafts to be raised for each pick, replacing the tie-up of treadles on a floor loom.

A single pass of the weft through a shed.

Weave structure where the weft travels over and under the warp without skipping any threads.

Threading cycles through the shafts in one direction and then reverses direction, eg., 1-2-3-2-1.

Edge of woven cloth.

Spacing of the warp yarns.

The opening created when the heddles are lifted or lowered. Each weft pick passes through a shed.

The placing of the warp threads through the dents of the reed.

A symmetrically crossbarred, multi-colored design of the traditional Scottish textiles. (Harriet Tidball)

The order each warp end passes through a heddle on a specific shaft.

Diagrams the shaft combinations raised or lowered by each treadle to make the sheds required by the weave structure.

Order treadles are pressed; the order in which each shed is made.

Lengthwise threads on a loom that are held under tension.